Using myofascial discharge for fibromyalgia, Lyme and related chronic pain

Using myofascial discharge for fibromyalgia, Lyme and related chronic pain | Fibrowomen.co

You probably are asking right now, “What’s the heck of myofascial release?” Yeah, it’s like massage, but it doesn’t really feel like massage. Myofascial release (MFR) is a bodywork that physical therapist John Barnes has created. The muscle tissue and fascia have steady, gentle pressure to break up adhesions.

At least two European studies (referred to here and here) have found MFR to be effective in reducing fibromyalgia pain, according to Fibromyalgia expert and father-in-law Dr. Ginevra Liptan. MFR is also useful in the treatment of various types of back pain, urgency / incontinence of the bladder, migraines, arthritis, and other conditions.

As I read Liptan’s novel, “The Fibro Manual” I studied the MFR for the first-time last year. She’s an enormous fan of MFR that she uses with the help of her own suffering.

I put MFR on my to-do list of mental wellbeing but did not try it in a hurry because massage therapy these times is simply torture. I used to like massage, but it’s too painful with a gentle massage therapist since I develop fibro and Lyme.

But I’ve been reading this article on how Lyme bacteria love hiding in fascia films. I started putting 2 + 2 in my mind together. When MFR breaks up and releases fascia, then it may help pull the bacteria from their hiding places, so that antibiotics and herbs that I use can kill them.

I planned my first full body MFR session at the end of June with Christine. I was concerned that it would be uncomfortable and I would end up in a blow afterwards because of my most recent massage experiences. But only when Christine pulled my arms did, I feel discomfort during my session. Subsequently, it only felt essentially that she squeezed and held my body in different areas. I wondered, as she did, how it would help anything in the world. In yet another futile operation, I thought I had just wasted more capital.

READ ALSO:  What did I learn about Fibromyalgia Expectations?

Yet I walked a little better as I left Christine’s office that day. The straightening of my breasts. I felt looser in my neck. The pressure I always have was definitely less in my legs. I felt… great. I just did.

Click Here to Visit the Store and find Much More….

I went home to wait for the beginning of the flare. With preparation, I even took some ibuprofen, but it never came. I had less discomfort overall for the next couple of days. I began waiting for my next MFR session in three weeks’ time.

The unforeseen occurred then. My lower back began to ache, and I was sitting at my desk on 3 July. As the day progressed, I found that my lower back was pinched, causing sciatic pain to my left leg. I made a few strands of sciatica, hoping to fix the problem, but I’d basically just go to bed or sofa by the following day. I couldn’t go straight sometimes. I crawled a few times practically up the stairs, because it was too difficult to ascend normally. I’m used to fibromyalgia and Lyme pain every day, but pain has been completely new. Over the days, I begged for my’ usual’ fibro / Lyme pain to come back in place of the agony that I felt.

I’ve had a few chiropractic adjustments, but they’ve been really effective. I’ve seen my general practitioner prescribing prednisone and muscle relaxers for a few days. The drugs helped, but when I stopped taking it, the pain came back.

One week after my symptoms began, I urgently called Christine to see whether she could help. She worked for more than an hour, pushing her hands through my neck, hip and buttocks, squeezing them and gripping them. But it hurt well. It hurt. I knew without any doubt that she had magic hands as I stood from her massage table. It was nowhere as severe as it was–but enough I called Christine to ask if she would work again her magic. I was relief for four days and then the pain returned.

READ ALSO:  Here are 10 items I want people to know, being a Doctor of Fibromyalgia.

I am able for Christine and MFR to sit at my desk here and write this article. I’m a convert, a real faithful man. He’s been right Dr. Liptan… again. I should study MFR if you had fibromyalgia or other conditions that cause chronic muscle pain. Surely for me, it was a blessing in recent weeks.

To find a practitioner in the area…

Please visit the page of John Barnes to find a doctor on his website for people interested in myofascial releases. This will be the best place for a local practitioner to search. There are many massage therapists from what I have heard who say myofascial releases but a real MFR practicing practitioner was specifically trained in the technology of John Barnes. Going to a massage therapist who has studied several MFRs at a massage school is not the same and will probably not achieve the same results.

Leave a Reply